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Collection Updates

The Kenneth A. Aidekman Family Foundation generously gifts Robert Hernandez's (MFA 2009) Untitled drawing to the Tufts University Permanent Art Collection in 2009.


Robert Hernandez, Untitled, 2007-8 archival ink marker, white Sharpie paint marker, and pencil on birch plywood surface, 4 x 4 ft.; gift of Kenneth A. Aidekman Family Foundation

"I find all of Rob Hernandez's works appealing. The key interest for me is his ability to capture the essence of a three dimensional object in simplified line. Rob's lines are elegant, economic and full of character. The fact that his current work involves layer upon layer of line drawings does not take away from the craftsmanship of each individually sketched layer. While there are a lot of graffiti and cartoon influences in the figures and objects that Rob creates, there is also timelessness in his drawing efficiency, something he shares with great artists. The panels have a feeling of lightness. They are not over-worked. Why this particular piece? It has everything. It has sex, violence, a jet plane, a helicopter, weapons, Kim Jong-il, rabbits, pigs, a wolf in clothing, women, gang members, a DJ, robots and more. It's an everything-all-the-time assault on the visual senses. Hernandez's stated goal is to process the overwhelming quantity of images presented to us by news, entertainment and marketing media. It's all too much. The result can be pretty messy, but one gets the sense of a young man trying his best to keep his head above the rising tide of "garbage-in." Hernandez a way to go to deal with all of this information successfully and then "re-present" it in a cohesive, organized way through his own unique vision. He is the kind of artist you want to check back with in the future to view his progress. I also believe that this is youthful work that will appeal to undergraduate students. It encompasses subjects and styles with which they are familiar."

-Kenneth A. Aidekman (A75)